Watch This Tarantula Crawl Out of Its Own Skeleton | National Geographic

Watch This Tarantula Crawl Out of Its Own Skeleton | National Geographic

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For over three hours, this female Mexican Red Knee tarantula molts its exoskeleton.
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Exoskeletons are stiff, outer structures that protect internal organs. In order to grow larger, tarantulas secrete a new exoskeleton, outgrowing their previous covering. After molting, their new skin is soft, making them more vulnerable to predation. Mexican Red Knees take several days for their new exoskeleton to fully harden.

Click here to read more about the tarantula.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/05/mexican-red-knee-tarantula-molting-exoskeleton-video/

Watch This Tarantula Crawl Out of Its Own Skeleton | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/evyunVf4u1A

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