Ruins—and Fierce Weaponry—From Bloody Roman Battle Discovered | National Geographic

Ruins—and Fierce Weaponry—From Bloody Roman Battle Discovered | National Geographic

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In Scotland, archaeologists are investigating ruins of a fort flanked by two Roman camps.
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Earlier studies suggested that Roman soldiers used the fort at Burnswark as a firing range. But new evidence suggests it was the scene of a bloody battle nearly 1900 years ago. With metal detectors, the researchers searched for Roman ammunition across the site. In hot spots identified by the metal detectors, they excavated several trenches. They found lead sling bullets. Experiments show these have the stopping power of a .44 magnum cartridge. The team also found Roman artillery ammunition known as ballista balls. The lightly armed Scots in the fort were likely slaughtered to the last person.

Click here to read more about the discovery.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/05/ancient-slingshot-lethal-44-magnum-scotland/

Ruins—and Fierce Weaponry—From Bloody Roman Battle Discovered | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/sQ8l3eCbxcc

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