How Did These Ancient Bugs Attract Mates? Rare Amber Find Tells Us...

How Did These Ancient Bugs Attract Mates? Rare Amber Find Tells Us | National Geographic

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A discovery of three damselflies in amber from Myanmar has given researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences a rare view into the way these tiny 100 million-year-old animals lived. Modern damselflies, close relatives of dragonflies, have a complicated courtship ritual. As reported by the scientists, in these fossil specimens, large spotted structures on the males’ legs would have been an aid in signaling for a mate, in a function similar to a bird’s showy plumage or a deer’s antlers.
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Learn more about the discovery:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/03/damselfly-mating-amber-cretaceous-era/

How Did These Ancient Bugs Attract Mates? Rare Amber Find Tells Us | National Geographic
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